30.01.14

Lea Michele for Teen Vogue March 2014

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Lea Michele graces the March 2014 issue of Teen Vogue looking soft and pretty, wearing a white eyelet frock with her long locks piled up into a loose bun.

The ‘Glee’ starlet talks to the magazine about her debut album ‘Louder’, and how boyfriend Cory Monteith inspired her to pursue a music career before his untimely death.

On her upcoming album: “During Glee, I felt like I was scratching that itch of being an artist. I was at a great place in my life and I was so unbelievably happy—my relationship with Cory [Monteith] made me feel like I could reach for the stars and more. So I was like, ‘I’m going to challenge myself and do this record now.’ It’s obviously pop, but I think it shows me off as a singer.”

On Cory’s favourite song from her upcoming album ‘Louder': “He was such a fan, you don’t understand. He would be like, ‘You’re going to be a pop star! What are we going to do? Are we going to, like, go on the road?’ He would say, ‘This is going to be big!’ And I’d be like, ‘I don’t know.’ He heard every song and gave me his notes on everything. He loved ‘Battlefield’. I’m getting chills thinking about it. I would say ‘Burn with You’ was his favourite. He came into the studio that day.”

On where she got strength after Cory’s death: “I somehow feel the insane love Cory and I had for each other morphed into this strength that I have right now. There’s just something about knowing he’s watching everything I’m doing and feeling like I have to do everything now not just for me but for him. I also have a safety net below me—if I fall or if it’s too much, my friends and family will be there to catch me.”

Credit: Teen Vogue

17.01.14

Keira Knightley For Harper’s Bazaar UK February 2014

Keira Knightley For Harper’s Bazaar UK February 2014

Keira Knightley covers the February 2014 issue of Harper’s Bazaar UK wearing, you guessed it, Chanel, shot by Alexi Lubomirski.

The British star can also been seen wearing a mix of Spring 2014 pieces from Balenciaga, Burberry Prorsum, Hermes, Valentino, Fendi, Michael Kors, Stella McCartney and Bottega Veneta in her editorial. It’s quite a fashion feast.

She talks to the mag about feminism, acting in the ‘boys club’ and why she will never join Twitter again.

Here is what the 28-year-old ‘Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit’ actress had to share with the mag:

On feminism: “I think it’s great that the discussions are finally being allowed to be had [about feminism], as opposed to anybody mentioning feminism and everybody going, ‘Oh, f***ing shut up.’ Somehow, it [feminism] became a dirty word. I thought it was really weird for a long time, and I think it’s great that we’re coming out of that.”

On working in the male-dominated film industry: “I go to work at 5.30 in the morning; I wouldn’t get back probably until nine o’clock at night. Most of the guys that I talk to – and I’ve spoken to a lot of guys about it – they say [whispers], ‘My wife does everything.’ You think, ‘Why wasn’t I thinking about this five years ago?’ Hollywood has a really long way to go. I don’t think that anybody can deny that, really, and I think as much as you are getting more women playing lead roles… they’re still pretty few and far between.”

On why she was only on Twitter for 12 hours: “It made me feel a little bit like being in a school playground and not being popular and standing on the sidelines kind of going, ‘Argh.’”

Credit: Alexi Lubomirski for Harper’s Bazaar UK

16.01.14

Lena Dunham For Vogue US February 2014

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Lena Dunham – the New Queen of Comedy, according to American Vogue – lands her first Vogue cover for the publication’s February 2014 issue, which hits newsstands January 28.

Looking slightly perturbed, the actress wears a red-and-white polka-dot Burberry Prorsum shirt and heavy sixties-style eye makeup on the cover, wearing Prada, Rochas, Alexander McQueen and Dolce & Gabbana for the rest of the editorial, shot by Annie Leibovitz.

She talks to Vogue about dating, her privacy, on being popular as a child and why ‘Girls’ is different from other shows.

Here are some extracts from her interview. Read more over at Vogue.com.

On ‘Girls’ being different from other shows: “There was a sense that I and many women I knew had been led astray by Hollywood and television depictions of sexuality. Seeing somebody who looks like you having sex on television is a less comfortable experience than seeing somebody who looks like nobody you’ve ever met. Critics said, ‘That guy wouldn’t date that girl!’ It’s like, ‘Have you been out on the street lately?’ Everyone dates everyone, for lots of reasons we can’t understand. Sexuality isn’t a perfect puzzle, like, ‘He has a nice nose and she has a nice nose! She’s got great breasts and he’s got great calves! And so they’re going to live happily ever after in a house that was purchased with their modelling money!’ It’s a complicated thing. I want people ultimately, even if they’re disturbed by certain moments, to feel bolstered and normalized by the sex that’s on the show.”

On being a private person: “No one would describe me as a private person, but I actually really am. It’s important for me to have a lot of time alone, and to have a lot of time in my house by myself. My entire life sort of takes place between me and my dog, my books, and my boyfriend, and my private world. To me, privacy isn’t necessarily equated with secret-keeping. What’s private is my relationship with myself.”

On her young self: “I thought of myself as relatively unpopular. It wasn’t anybody’s fault—I didn’t go to high school with mean kids—but I didn’t feel part of it. . . I didn’t really start to feel like I had friends in a real way until I graduated from college and became engaged with the people I’d be engaged with professionally.”

Credit: Annie Leibovitz for Vogue

10.01.14

W Magazine’s Movie Issue

W Magazine Movie Issue

W magazine’s ‘Movie’ issue features six different covers chronicling the best films and performances of 2013, including Amy Adams, Oprah, Lupita Nyong’o, Jennifer Lawrence (in Dolce & Gabbana), Cate Blanchett and Matthew McConaughey, all of which were captured by Juergen Teller.

The surprising thing about these covers is that Jennifer doesn’t appear to be wearing Dior; that honour was bestowed upon Lupita.

Jennifer shared with the mag that moment when she fell at the 2013 Oscars, saying “I was at the Oscars, waiting to hear if my name was called, and I kept thinking, ‘Cakewalk, cakewalk, cakewalk’. I thought, ‘Why is ‘cakewalk’ stuck in my head? ’ And then, as I started to walk up the stairs and the fabric from my dress tucked under my feet, I realized my stylist had told me ‘Kick, walk, kick, walk.’ You are supposed to kick the dress out while you walk, and I totally forgot because I was thinking about cake! And that’s why I fell”.

Which cover will you be picking up?

Credit: Juergen Teller for W

19.12.13

Cate Blanchett for Vogue US January 2014

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Cate Blanchett graces her fifth cover for American Vogue for the January 2014 issue.

The Australian actress was shot by Craig McDean ready for the new season wearing a printed top and pop-art bracelet from Celine’s Spring 2014 collection, with the rest of her editorial seeing her wearing Armani Prive, Michael Kors, Nina Ricci and Dolce & Gabbana.

She is tipped for another Oscar after a mesmerising performance in ‘Blue Jasmine’ and is starring in George Clooney’s ‘The Monuments Men’.

On the possibility of leaving Hollywood, Cate said “I’m always threatening to give up acting. But then I get seduced back into it.”

She also shares with the mag, “I feel like I’m standing on the brink of something exciting.”

Having been nominated for a Golden Globe Award and Screen Actors Guild Award, and with an Oscar nomination most definitely on the horizon, is the actress predicting a clean sweep?

Credit: Craig McDean for Vogue

05.12.13

Zoe Saldana For Flare January 2014

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Zoe Saldana was captured by James White for the cover of Flare Magazine’s January 2014 issue wearing a Jean Paul Gaultier trench, Salvatore Ferragamo top, Jason Wu skirt and hot pants, plus B Brian Atwood heels.

The ‘Nina’ star talks to the Canadian mag about her no-regrets policy about portraying Nina Simone, the challenges of male-dominated sets, the power of women today, not caring what anyone says about her, and her secret softer side.

On the power of women today: “Women aren’t wimpy. They don’t complain all the time. They can open up jars! They can fucking save the day! They can support their whole family. They can support their men. Half of my friends make more money than their male partners.”

On life lessons: “You have to learn from your experiences. I’ve been in compromising circumstances, and I wish I’d had the strength that I have now because I would have protected myself better. I would have stood up for myself better. Women are challenged every day and are sometimes encouraged to objectify themselves. And it hurts.”

On not caring what anyone says about her: “There’s nothing anybody can say or think about me that I will give a shit about. Honestly.”

On her secret soft side: “It’s so funny: the characters I played in ‘Columbiana’ and ‘Avatar’, on the surface, there’s what appears to be strength, but it’s sugar-coating an immense vulnerability. I am tough, but I’m also a very vulnerable person. I trust everyone. For many years I thought, I need to stop being this way, but no, I just need to learn from it.”

On the challenge of male-dominated sets: “You’d see all the boys together, and they’re discussing the scene and what’s going to happen. You just go, ‘yeah, but…’ and they say, ‘oh, but we already discussed that’”. In these instances, Zoe has no problem saying “‘I understand everything you’re saying, but these are the terms we agreed on, and that is why I got on a plane and came out here, and I decided to have your back, and now I don’t feel like you’re having my back. This character is invisible. She’s completely irrelevant, and she should be more. ’”

On her no-regrets policy about ‘Nina': “At the end of the day, no matter how the movie is received, I’m not going to regret anything.”

Credit: James White for Flare